The Corporation, Canada’s most successful documentary in history, is the winner of 26 international awards and 10 Audience Choice Awards including the 2004 Sundance Film Festival. The film is based on the book The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan.

Watch Online: The Corporation – [Part 1]

camera.jpg

Watch Online : The Corporation – [Part 2]

camera.jpg

Synopsis: THE CORPORATION is a well-organized and deeply fascinating documentary about the growing prominence of large global businesses, and the way that their decisions are impacting the world. The film shows how corporations have ballooned in size and power since the industrial revolution, and explains the laws and loopholes that allow them to remain nearly unaccountable for their actions. If they break a law, they are willing to admit guilt and pay the fine, because the profits outweigh the penalties. Therefore, they continue to cause serious environmental problems by dumping waste into rivers and oceans and by depleting natural resources, resulting in irreversible damage to the earth which also poses a serious threat to human life. Beyond environmental issues, the film shows how corporations exploit underpaid laborers in third world countries, violate basic human rights, make deals with foreign countries who are known enemies of the U.S., and in some instances perpetuate fascist regimes. Valuable, informative talking-head commentary comes from a diverse group including Ray Anderson, CEO of carpet manufacturer Interface; Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, former chairman of Royal Dutch Shell; Dr. Vandana Shiva, feminist and ecologist; Milton Friedman, Nobel prize-winning economist; Marc Barry, corporate spy; Joe Badaracco, professor of business ethics at Harvard; and activists Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn, and Michael Moore. Providing useful references to major news stories that illustrate various corporate developments, and good information about how the system works, THE CORPORATION empowers viewers and shows them that they can realistically enact change. For that reason, this documentary makes real progress, encouraging viewers to take the world’s future into their own hands and away from corporations whose sole interest is profit.

Review [by Rober Ebert]:

I was at a health ranch last week, where the idea is to clear your mind for serene thoughts. At dinner one night, a woman at the table referred to Arizona as a “right to work state.” Unwisely, I replied: “Yeah — the right to work cheap.” She said, “I think you’ll find the non-union workers are quite well paid.” Exercising a supreme effort of will to avoid pronouncing the syllables “Wal-Mart,” I replied: “If so, that’s because unions have helped raise salaries for everybody.” She replied: “The unions steal their members’ dues.” I replied, “How much money would you guess the unions have stolen, compared to corporations like Enron?” At this point our exchange was punctuated by a kick under the table from my wife, and we went back to positive thinking.”The Corporation” is not a film my dinner companion would enjoy. It begins with the unsettling information that, under the law, a corporation is not a thing but a person. The U.S. Supreme Court so ruled, in a decision based, bizarrely, on the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. That was the one that guaranteed former slaves equal rights. The court ruling meant corporations were given the rights of individuals in our society. They are free at last.
If Monsanto and WorldCom and Enron are indeed people, what kind of people are they? The movie asks Robert Hare, a consultant who helps the FBI profile its suspects. His diagnosis: Corporations by definition have a personality disorder and can be categorized as psychopathic. That is because they single-mindedly pursue their own wills and desires without any consideration for other people (or corporations) and without reference to conventional morality. They don’t act that way to be evil; it’s just, as the scorpion explained to the frog, that it’s in their nature. [ read full]

Link: The Corporation Film Website

Advertisements