A new report from the OECD on the origin and structural characteristics of the immigrant population in OECD countries.

In practically all OECD countries, immigrants are more likely to be overqualified for their job than a person born in that country. In Denmark, Greece, Italy, Spain and Sweden, for example, the share of people doing a job for which they are overqualified is twice as high as for native-born workers. [From OECD]

From IP by Mattias Creffier, Feb 20, 2008:

PARIS, Feb 20 (IPS) – Rich countries must do more to integrate migrants into their societies and labour markets if they want to reap the economic benefits of skilled migration, says an OECD report released in Paris Wednesday.

In almost all countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), a grouping of 30 rich nations, migrants are more likely to work in jobs for which their skills are too high, the report says.

Migration and labour market researchers compiled national census data into a Database on Immigrants in OECD Countries (DIOC). For each of the 30 member states, they characterised migrant populations according to their countries of origin, age and education levels, occupation, and sector of activity.

A migrant was defined as “a person whose place of birth differs from his current country of residence.” Second-generation people of immigrant origin, and the problems they face, fall outside the scope of the report, ‘A Profile of Immigrant Populations in the 21st century’.

The report says that the share of people with tertiary education (usually a form of non-compulsory study after secondary education) in the OECD area is higher for the foreign born (24 percent) than for the native born (19.1 percent). But also, the share of people with no or low educational attainment is higher for immigrants than for the native-born.

More recent migrants tend to be better educated than those in earlier waves. Few of the older Italian, Greek and Portuguese immigrants in the OECD area have tertiary education, whereas the recent migration of highly skilled Chinese and Indians to the U.S. has led to an over-representation of Asians in the IT and science sectors.

In Greece, Spain and Italy, the share of people doing a job for which they are overqualified is twice as high as for native-born workers.

These have only recently become immigration countries. Migrating workers may have problems with the language, and may need a while to overcome legal and administrative obstacles, the report says. They seem willing to accept unskilled jobs, hoping to climb the social ladder later on. [read more here]

From OECD:

This publication presents some of the most comprehensive information currently available on the origin and structural characteristics of the immigrant population in OECD countries.

It includes a large set of tables and charts describing demographic characteristics (age, gender, duration of stay) and labour market outcomes (labour market status, occupation, sector of activity) of immigrant and native-born populations by educational level and country of birth.

These are covered in nine thematic chapters, each including a brief description of sources, a discussion of cross-country differences as well as a short analysis of a specific issue, such as the gender dimension of the brain drain, the international migration of health professionals, or the role of low-skilled foreign-born workers in domestic services. (read more here)

Advertisements